IDDT – West Midlands #Diabetes Study Day – Birmingham, 16th May for #hcps

Aimed at healthcare professionals (hcps).

West Midlands Diabetes Study Day
http://iddt.org/4017/west-midlands-diabetes-study-day-book-a-place

Friday, 16th May, 2014
The Paragon Hotel, 145 Alcester Street, Birmingham B12 0PJ
9am to 4.15pm

Organised by the InDependent Diabetes Trust (IDDT), this is the second in a brand new series of Diabetes Study Days, which aim to inform, inspire and educate the healthcare community.

Programme and booking details (PDF).

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ISO 15197:2013 & #diabetes – will new stds for blood glucose meter accuracy affect what’s on the market?

Is the new ISO 15197:2013 for blood glucose meter accuracy likely to bump a few BG meters off the market? 

ISO 15197:2013: In vitro diagnostic test systems — Requirements for blood-glucose monitoring systems for self-testing in managing diabetes mellitus”

The new (I say new, they came out last year but I’ve been out of the ‘diabetosphere’ for a while) guidelines can be found here but they cost CHF 154,000 which is a wee bit more than I want to cough up to read them. You can preview some of the document here.

The ISO’s own blog has written about this “More accurate self-testing results for diabetes patients with new ISO standard“.

Blood glucose meter and testing strips

See also

“The reliability of self-monitored glucose values is a prerequisite for an efficient and safe approach to treat patients to their target. Accuracy of SMBG, therefore, is a key aspect in this regard.9 Recently, accuracy requirements have been tightened. According to the revised ISO standard 15197:2013, 95% of the blood glucose (BG) results shall fall within ±15 mg/dl of the reference method at BG concentrations < 100 mg/dl and within ±15% at BG concentrations ≥ 100 mg/dl.10 The less restrictive ISO standard 15197:2003 loses its validity after a transitional period of 3 years.11

Source: Schnell and Erbach (2014) Impact of a Reduced Error Range of SMBG in Insulin-treated Patients in GermanyJournal of Diabetes Science and Technology February 5, 2014, doi: 10.1177/1932296813516206

There’s also been some discussion on the children-with-diabetes forum: Accuracy of blood glucose meters draws scrutiny childrenwithdiabetes (21 May 2013).

See also FDA to ISO 15197: Not good enough The Westgard Rules blog (15 January 2014)

“FDA believes that the criteria set forth in the ISO 15197 standard do not adequately protect patients using BGMS devices in professional settings, and does not recommend using these criteria for BGMS devices.” – quote excerpted from recent FDA draft guideline on blood glucose meters (line 277).

 

 

 

 

[Job, London] @DiabetesUK, Clinical Advisor x2, c£40k, clos 8 July 2013

You get to go on the telly and stuff as well 🙂

Diabetes UK
Clinical Advisor x2
http://www.diabetes.org.uk/About_us/Jobs/Vacancies-/Clinical-Advisors/
also
http://www.i-appoint.co.uk/diabetesuk/job_details.php?vid=177&ref=DUK39&desc=Clinical+Advisors+x2&featured=1

Job description: Job_Description-Clinical_Advisors_x2

Job Tenure:
» 1 x permanent fulltime post
» 1 x fulltime fixed term contract (until March 2014)

Location: Camden, London
Salary:  Circa £40,000 per annum
Application closing date:  Monday 08 July 2013 (9.00am)
Interview date: July 2013 TBC

Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges facing the UK today. Diabetes UK is the country’s largest charity devoted to the care, treatment and improvement of the quality of life for people with diabetes.  Our success in supporting people is underpinned by our clear and consistent values relating to high performance, integrity, empowering, valuing others and working together.

Are you passionate about improving diabetes care?  Are you looking for an exciting and rewarding post?

An exciting opportunity has arisen for two clinical advisors to join the Policy and Care Improvement Directorate – one permanent post to cover a retirement and one fixed term contract providing maternity cover.  We are looking for motivated, innovative, enthusiastic team players with excellent communication and organisation skills to join our dynamic team. 

The clinical team works closely with the Head of Care to create the conditions to improve standards of diabetes care and the lives of people with and at risk diabetes.   The team is responsible for the production of high quality clinical and policy information that reflect Diabetes UK’s health agenda and how it relates to people living with diabetes and people working within the field of diabetes care. 

We are looking for a Diabetes Specialist Nurse and/or Specialist Dietitian with at least 4 years clinical experience and at least one years experience working in a diabetes specialist area.  You will have a sound knowledge of diabetes and challenges facing diabetes care and be able to show evidence of professional development. 

The work is varied and no two days are the same.  The post-holder will develop consistent, high quality information and education interventions, share clinical knowledge and indentify needs for care programmes and tools for people living with diabetes and healthcare professionals.  You will be an expert clinical resource for internal colleagues and network with external agencies impacting on the care of people with and at risk of diabetes.

The applicant should be dynamic, forward thinking and work imaginatively.  You should be able to work independently and as part of a team and be flexible while working to tight deadlines. 

In return, we provide Group Personal Pension scheme, Childcare Voucher scheme, flexi-time working, Life Assurance/Death in Service Benefits and enhanced Annual Leave entitlement.

For more information and to apply please visit www.i-appoint.co.uk/diabetesuk and complete our downloadable application form. Select the appropriate vacancy and click ‘Apply For Job’. If not registered already you will be required to register on the i-appoint website.

Please ensure you address the essential criteria in your application’s supporting statement. All applications must be made using the form – we cannot accept CVs.

#Diabetes Manager – a free iPhone app for people w diabetes, from Patient.co.uk

This is a sort of but not quite press release about a new diabetes app for people with smartphones. Not investigated it myself, this comes from the wonderful CHAIN (Contact, Help, Advice & Information Network) which I have recommended many times on this blog before and continue to do so. It’s free to sign up.

‘I would like to let people with an interest in Diabetes know about a brand new free application Patient.co.uk have launched ahead of next week’s Diabetes Week, which helps people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes to easily record and monitor their condition.

Called ‘Diabetes Manager’ the application tracks various key indicators such as the number and severity of hypos, blood glucose levels and food and drink intake and is completely customisable.

Commenting on the application, Dr Hayley Willacy, who peer-reviewed Diabetes Manager said: “One of the most useful and practical aspects to this app is the ability for patients to see their records easily in a graph and save their most notable records as talking points to discuss with their GP. What’s more they can export and share their results with their doctor.”

David Cragg, a patient with diabetes who provided user insight to our team during the development of the app said: “It’s great that an organisation such as Patient.co.uk has engaged people with diabetes to help shape their iPhone application. The resulting application has some truly unique features, such as marking notable entries to help locate results when discussing concerns with health care professionals.”

To find out more and download the app you can visit: http://www.patient.co.uk/press-releases/launch-of-free-clinically-backed-diabetes-manager-app

See also: Diabetes UK Tracker app for people with diabetes (available for iPhone and Android) – this app won the Third Sector Excellence Award for use of digital media, in September 2012.

#Diabetes features in new patient safety resource from the Health Foundation

The Health Foundation have put together a patient safety resource with a focus on safety management, frail older people and diabetes.

The landing page for ‘Area of care’ looks like this…

Screen Shot 2013-05-22 at 23.42.52

…which then takes you to the Diabetes page which contains a list of options:

Screen Shot 2013-05-22 at 23.46.23

Notification of this new resource came to me via the CHAIN mailing list, it’s rather useful:

CHAINContact, Help, Advice and Information Network – is an online international network for people working in health and social care. For more information on CHAIN and joining the network please visit website: http://chain.ulcc.ac.uk/chain/index.html

Follow CHAIN on Twitter: @CHAIN_Network ; Find us on Facebook; Connect with CHAIN on LinkedIn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical device alert: Medtronic insulin pumps – #diabetes

I recently signed up to the MHRA’s alerts emails and this one has me a little bit confused. It was ‘issued’ on Friday 17 May but references a document (Field Safety Notice) from March 2013, so perhaps it’s more of an update than a new thing. Anyway…

Medtronic pumps affected:
Paradigm ambulatory insulin infusion pumps.
Models: MMT – 511, 512, 712, 712E, 515, 715, 522, 722, 722K, 523, 723, 723K, 554 (VEO) and 754 (VEO).

Medical Device Alert: Paradigm ambulatory insulin infusion pumps manufactured by Medtronic (MDA/2013/035)
Note that there are tabs with different bits of information about the Device | Problem | Action | Distribution | Contacts and Feedback

The Distribution tag intrigued me – it’s a list of NHS and related departments / divisions / organisations to which this alert is communicated. The audience is primarily healthcare professionals but I am a little bit surprised that these things aren’t communicated to patient support groups as from the picture of the pump it seems like something a person with diabetes would use at home (perhaps I am wrong, perhaps these are only ever used in a hospital setting?) so why not use other means to tell them? Obviously healthcare professionals can contact their patients and distribute the info as needed, but I don’t see why a bit of redundancy can’t be built in here. Belts and braces 🙂

 

Watch out for the journal ‘Advances in Diabetes and Metabolism’ – it’s on Beall’s list

Jeffrey Beall keeps an eye on academic journal publishers and has a list of open access journals that are ‘predatory publishers’. He also blogs about new publishers and I was only slightly surprised to see a journal about diabetes in the 66-strong list of shiny new journals from ‘Horizon Research Publishing Corporation’ in his latest (2 May 2013) post.

Advances in Diabetes and Metabolism has two web addresses
http://www.hrpub.org/jour_info.php?id=71
and
http://zj.nkwww.com/jour_info.php?id=71

I don’t think anything’s been published in it yet (it seems they’re still trying to get the editorial board together so it might be a while) but be cautious…